Total Solar Eclipses Explained

20th March 2015 By ,   0 Comments

Parts of the UK and Europe are to be plunged into darkness as a Total Solar Eclipse takes place.

No – it’s a naturally occurring event.

Solar Eclipse – the moon’s orbit (the route it takes around the Earth) means it passes in front of the sun, blocking out the light temporarily.

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People are gathering across the UK to watch the Eclipse

What is a Total Solar Eclipses?

No – it’s a naturally occurring event.

Solar Eclipse – the moon’s orbit (the route it takes around the Earth) means it passes in front of the sun, blocking out the light temporarily.

This leads to darkness and in good conditions you can actually see the sun “disappearing”.

Eclipses of this kind are very rare as the orbits of the sun and moon do not often align. Today’s event is supposedly the best eclipse visible since 1999.

The next total solar eclipse viewable in the UK will be in 2090.

I’m In – When Is This?

The event began at 7.30 GMT today and a full eclipse is expected at around 09.30-09.45 GMT.

At 8.24AM this morning first contact was made in Cornwall with other parts of the UK expected to experience the eclipse later on.

It all finishes between 10.30 to 11.30 GMT when the full sun returns. So if you’re reading this at 11.45 then… I guess… there’s always pictures.

Ok, And Where Do I Need To Be?

Different areas of the UK will be affected differently.

The amount of sun concealed will increase the further north you are. In the UK the best places to view are the Isle of Lewis and the Isle of Shetland in Scotland where there is estimated to be 97% darkness.

But the best view (or lack of) will be in the Norwegian islands of Svalbard where there will be total darkness. Hotels in the area have been fully booked for today’ event since 2008.

Warning – Do  Not Look Directly At The Sun

We’ll repeat that! DO NOT LOOK DIRECTLY AT THE SUN! Got it? If you do you could be in danger of blindness, temporary or permanent.

There are ways to watch the Eclipse safely: Use specialist eclipse viewers or if you don’t have those a pin hole camera with your back to the sun.

How to watch a solar eclipse safely


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