The 4 Worst Strikes in History

8th July 2015 By ,   0 Comments

With another strike looming, Scenes of Reason looks back on the worst international strikes in history.

 

 

2005 New York City Transit Strike

 

new-york-transit-strike-2005

New York Transit Strike

Buses and subways were halted from December 20 to 22. Millions who relied on public transportation were effectively grounded.

Reason: The strike, on behalf of the Transport Workers Union, demanded from the Metropolitan Transit Authority pension, wage and retirement increases in unsuccessful contract negotiations.

Result: Workers were apparently adequately satisfied, as transit operations were back in full order in the late morning of December 22nd.

 

 

 

2009 UK Postal Strike

postman-pat

UK Postal Strike

Ten’s of millions of post went undelivered between 2009-10.

Reason: There was a threat that a new letter-route machine would result in a huge loss of jobs. The robots are coming!

Result: Higher pay and an agreement to maintain 75% of workers in full-time positions.

 

2012 Quebec Student Protests

 

lucky-strike

Quebec Student Strike

Student’s refused to go to school and instead took to the streets in protest over a planned rise in tuition fees. The protests lasted over six months and during its peak involved approximately 250,000 people. The activity blurred the line between striking and rioting as on several occasions the police turned violent. A square red flag was used as a symbol for the strikes.

Reason: Rise in tuition fees, from $2,168 to $3,793.

Result: Student associations returned to class when the ministerial decree announced a tuition freeze.

 

2014 South African Miners Strike

 

South African Miners Strike

Miner Strike

Workers at South Africa’s major platinum producers – Anglo American Platinum, Impala Platinum, and Lonmin refused to work over their wages.  It was the longest and most expensive strike in South African History.

Reason: Went on strike demanding that wages be immediately doubled.

Result: Settled for a more modest pay increase spread over three years.

 

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