Explained: The Investigatory Powers Bill


The Investigatory Powers Bill (IP Bill) will completely change up the laws that govern how the police, the government and spies gather communication between citizens and individuals on the internet – that’s me and you chatting on Facebook, that’s you being on this website right now, and that’s also you ordering a cheeky Nandos on the weekend. The new laws are unprecedented around the world and will be a legal first when it comes to the extent of government surveillance powers.

ISIS Explained: Seven Suggested Ways To Combat ISIS


Part of the ISIS Explained series.

Part 1: What is ISIS?  //  Part 2: What does ISIS want?  //  Part 3: What makes ISIS powerful?

Part 4: 7 Suggested Ways to Fight ISIS  //  Part 5: ISIS Frequently Asked Questions Explained



A global coalition of 62 countries led by the United States is fighting the terrorist group so-called “Islamic State” (ISIS). Different countries contribute in different ways. What’s the best way to tackle terrorist groups?


Tell Me About Airstrikes

ISIS Fighting Terrorist Groups - Airstrike attack

Source: Wikipedia

The USA loves airstrikes. It has used them on 2,600 ISIS targets since 2014. Many countries including Australia, Canada, Saudi Arabia and France also got involved. The UK is bombing Islamic State in Iraq, but not in Syria. MPs voted against similar action in Syria in 2013. This was mainly because Iraq asked for our help – the Syrian government hasn’t.

A Parliament committee suggested focusing instead on bringing peace to the country. Sensible, no? Despite this David Cameron wants to extend airstrikes to Syria… but won’t risk losing a vote in Parliament.





Put Boots On The Ground?

Let’s face it, there’s only so much you can do from the air. A source within the Armed Forces told us that for every ISIS fighter taken out by airstrikes, another is recruited. Last year it was reported that Drone Strikes in Yemen were causing more people to join extremist groups. Their books are always full.

Fighting Terrorist Groups ISIS - A soldier from the 2nd Battalion in Iraq in 2003, armed with an L85A2

Source: Wikipedia

Air Chief Sir Michael Graydon says airstrikes aren’t enough to stop terrorist groups such as ISIS. We need to send in the army. This view is shared by Colonel Richard Kemp who calls the current US-led airstrikes “half-hearted”. Kemp believes the Special Forces should conduct raids to “kill and strike fear into the hearts of IS fighters.”

It’s unclear how many fighters ISIS has. The CIA estimated around 30,000 people. A senior Kurdish leader says the group has 200,000 fighters. It could be argued that a few SAS raids wouldn’t do much damage. The Iraq War cost the UK £8.4 billion, so sending across an army would be costly.  With the size of the British army shrinking to 83,000 by 2020 we’d probably need backup. Russia however, say they are prepared to send 150,000 troops into Syria so we might see a partnership in the making. 


Don’t Put Boots On The Ground?

The current situation in Syria is a mess. As well as ISIS the country is divided by a civil war between the government and rebel groups. Most countries agree that ISIS need to be abolished, but can’t agree on how Syria should be governed. The UK says Syria’s President Assad can’t stay in power due to his record on human rights. Russia on the other hand supports Assad partly because he buys Russian weapons. Sending soldiers into Syria without a long-term plan might not be the greatest idea and probably why there has been hesitation thus far. 

Something you might not know: wars can lead to the creation of terror groups. Foreign Policy Journal describes how ISIS “was born out of the Iraq war”; President Obama calls it an “unintended consequence”.

There are two main types of Muslim: Sunni and Shia. In Iraq, the Sunnis had been in charge since the 1920s. However when the US and the UK entered the country to take out Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein in 2003, they handed over power to a Shia government. The Sunnis who had mostly boycotted this process, were not happy.

ISIS began as a group called Jam’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad. They were a collection of Sunni Muslim resistance fighters fighting in Iraq and Jordan. The group formed in 1999 and became a major force during the 2003 Iraq War. The group joined other Iraqi rebels fighting Western forces. Eventually they joined Islamist group Al-Qaeda and their fight against the West. In 2006 they and other Islamist groups created the Mujahideen Shura Council,  which later rebranded as ISIS.

Many experts believe the chaos in the aftermath of the Iraq War meant ISIS was able to grow stronger. The Guardian describes that though the name may have changed “the group’s grievances have been largely consistent. Central to them is the belief that the invasion destroyed a regional order, ousting a stalwart of Sunni rule, and inviting the rival Shia sect to take over.”

If wars create terror groups like ISIS, declaring war on those groups legitimizes them as a state. This, as Matthew Norman at the Independent writes, is exactly what ISIS wants.


Cut Off Supplies For Terrorist Groups

ISIS Fighting Terrorist Groups- The pumpjack oil well,  as this one located south of Midland, Texas

Source: Wikipedia

“A crucial way to help defeat ISIL is to cut off its funding, its supply of arms, and its trade,says Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour party. He pressed David Cameron to clamp down on Britain’s allies which may be providing support to ISIS.
Maybe he has a point. It’s easier to fight an enemy with weakened supplies. It’s estimated ISIS could be making up to $3 million a day selling oil from captured oil fields. Saudi Arabia, Qatar and Turkey have all been accused of assisting ISIS. All three countries deny the charges, and considering as they are in the oil game themselves, chances are they see ISIS as a threat. Stopping people buying oil from ISIS would reduce their income and limit their operations. Trying to identify buyers is the hard part. The Green Party recently got into trouble for accusing an oil company of buying from Islamic State. Awkward.

One step further would be to crack down on all companies accused of War Profiteering. It is what it says on the tin, profiting from war. As we’ve seen above, violence and conflict provides a space for extremist groups to flourish. Though war profiteers don’t cause violence, they supply the resources and it is unfortunate that both the media and politicians might have their part to play in this process. Comedian Russell Brand believes we should question the information we receive from the media and politicians for exactly this reason. 

“The media just want to create stories and tacitly support the corporations that benefit from wars in foreign countries – because they are the corporations that benefit from those wars.”


Take the Fight Against Terrorist Groups Online

ISIS Fighting Terrorist Groups - Cyber Warriors flex digital muscle at 2014 Cyber Shield Exercise

Source: Wikipedia

We don’t mean trolling ISIS supporters on Twitter like Hacker group AnonymousChancellor George Osborne takes cyber warfare seriously; it is seen just as much as a threat as it is a weapon. He’s investing £2 billion in a new National Cyber Centre to target terrorist groups online.

“If our electricity supply, or our air traffic control, or our hospitals were successfully attacked online, the impact could be measured not just in terms of economic damage but of lives lost.”

Does this mean we could do the same in retaliation, or indeed that we should be worried? This year regulators in the US announced that certain hospital drug pumps could be hacked through the hospital network. This could be used to give an overdose to patients. Yet though ISIS may have a cyber army, its soldiers need lessons on internet security. One ISIS member gave away his location by posting selfies.


Use Former Extremists to De-Radicalise Potential Terrorists

Stopping young Brits from becoming radicalised would deny terror groups new recruits. It could also reduce the risk of attack from “home grown” British terrorists. The UK government funds Channel, a secretive de-radicalisation scheme which attempts to steer young people from radicalisation. Eight people a day were referred to Channel this summer.

Apart from salvaging potential radicals, there could be a use for them too. Charlie Winter from anti-extremism think tank Quilliam Foundation thinks former extremists can be useful in de-radicalising potential terrorists. Speaking to the IB Times he said that they know the ideology which will be taught to recruits and can offer counter arguments. Quilliam was set up by Maajid Nawaz, a former Islamist extremist. Another British former extremist has created a cartoon series designed to discourage young Muslims from joining extremist groups. That’s not to mention several times Muslims took action against Islamic Extremism.


So, what about talking to ISIS?

This is a controversial question. Should we try to negotiate with extremist groups? The British government’s official line is that it does not negotiate with terrorists. Negotiating legitimizes terror groups by acknowledging that their demands are real. However, it seems there are exceptions to the rule. In the 1980s then Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher stated she would not talk or negotiate with the Irish Republican Army, seeing them as terrorists. It was later revealed that she had taken part in negotiation with the group. However, the communication did not lead to a deal. More recently the G7 countries made a pledge in 2013 not to talk to terrorists. Could current problems be solved by just sitting down and having a chat with ISIS? Somehow we doubt it.


Fighting Terrorist Groups; is there really a solution?

Terrorism techniques are constantly evolving. It could be argued there is no solution. Governments and anti-extremism groups must constantly change tactics to keep up. Which approach do you think is best?

Take part: The Quilliam Foundation is looking for young people to create a short film to challenge extreme views.


NEXT: Still got questions? Check out Part 5: ISIS Frequently Asked Questions Answered.

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What are Libel Payouts? Not the type of money you want to receive…


“To publish in print (including pictures), writing or broadcast through radio, television or film, an untruth, I repeat an untruth about another person which will ruin their reputation. Once the accusation is proved false, the victim can receive compensation in the form of money”.

Decoded: you are named, shamed and you didn’t do nothing, if you can prove your accuser wrong you can get some moneys.

Would it be worth it? Probably not, and most certainly not when you reach the bottom of this picture story:

Russell Brand Libel payouts
Russell Brand

Libel Payouts: Russell Brand

….received a libel payout from The Sun on Sunday newspaper when it ran a front page story stating that Brand had cheated on his girlfriend of the time Jemima Khan. He did care, and even donated the money to the Hillsborough campaign.

Andrew Mitchell


Libel Payouts: Andrew Mitchell

….Conservative MP, had to pay out £80,000 to Police Constable Toby Rowland upon calling him a ‘pleb’ after he wasn’t allowed to cycle through the main Downing Street vehicle gates. Mitchell denied the name calling but the vast amount of publicity that ensued caused great distress to PC Rowland, and we’re sure for Mitchell as well.


Chris Jefferies


 Libel Payouts: Chris Jefferies

….after the 2010 murder of Joanna Yeates, reporters wrongly pursued the innocent English teacher. Jefferies was the landlord of Joanna Yeates and was taken to ‘hell and back’ when accused of the murder. Media hassled Jefferies in public, commenting on his look of ‘guilt and shiftiness’. Both the Daily Mirror and The Sun were fined substantial amounts.

We wonder if the attention the papers would have received with their speculations, would have been worth the libel payouts?


KateMcCann, Gerry McCann
Kate and Gerry McCann


Libel Payouts: Kate and Gerry McCann

…sued ex-police chief Goncalo Amaral, who headed up the search for their daughter Madeleine who went missing while on holiday in Portugal in 2007. Mr Amaral made false claims in his book (a book deal is eyebrow raising anyway no?) and suggested the couple had faked her abduction. The McCann’s have been awarded £357,000 after a recent libel payouts case ended in their favour.


Now that you’re decoded, care to share your thoughts… if the media are attracting attention for a story, be it true or false, is it worth a libel payout?


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