Explain It To Me Like I’m 7: Trident

Oversight of the morning: believing the news were banging on about chewing gum.


What is TRIDENT?

The Trident system sees nuclear-armed missiles kept at-sea around the clock on one of four submarines, patrolling the deep oceans ready to strike if an attack were launched on Britain. The missiles can hit a city 7,000 miles away and travel at speeds of up to 13,000 miles an hour.

Where is it?navy uk .001Faslane Naval Base on Gare Loch, Argyll and Bute, Scotland. The base is one of three operating bases in the UK for the Navy. Others include Devonport, Falmouth and Portsmouth, this is also where you’ll find the majority of UK Navy ships.

Members of Parliament will vote next year on whether all this should be renewed.

Why does anything need to be renewed? 

For the same reasons you have to replace your car or pants every few years, or at least every twenty years. Trident was last renewed in 1994.

The Vanguard class of ballistic-missile submarines would benefit from a new class, maintaining continuous at-sea deterrence beyond the Vanguard lifespan” – in other words, it can be made better, to last longer and there might be a way to cut some costs.

What’s got everyone twittering about it now?


Even though the Labour party, led by Jeremy Corbyn, had voted not to talk about Trident at their conference this week, BBC Radio 4 politics programme The Today Show kind of spoiled that decision – asking Corbyn to tell them, in his new open and honest style of politics, whether or not he would personally push the button on nuclear warfare if he were Prime Minister. He said he wouldn’t, and Twitter blew up like a large bomb of some sort.

Is Corbyn cray-cray? Explore 5 Things Corbyn Wants and whether Nuclear Bombs are Good for Britain but Bad for the World.
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